Tag Archives: Baker Hotel

Song: Ghosts of the Baker Hotel

Texas songwriter Brian Burns wrote a wonderful ballad about the Grand Old Lady called Ghosts of the Baker Hotel.

Check out the words and listen to a clip, or listen to the full song via YouTube below.

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General William H. Simpson & The Baker Hotel

William H. SimpsonBefore General William Hood Simpson led the Ninth Army across the Rhine and into Germany in March of 1945, he served for a brief period as Commanding Officer at Camp Wolters from April to October 1941 in Mineral Wells.  According to a recorded interview in 1976 (in the Menger Hotel) with Simpson, he stated that he lived with his wife in the Baker Hotel during his seven-month stay in Mineral Wells.

General Simpson had been a man on the move his entire life.  As a boy, he grew up in and around Weatherford, Texas – only seventeen miles from Mineral Wells.  So during his seven months in Mineral Wells, it must have been a little bit like going home, although he admitted in an interview that the move to Camp Wolters was sudden and it caused him to doubt himself: “I’d really thought my career was ruined to be relieved as assistant commander of a combat division to command a replacement center.” Indeed, it was an interesting move to send a seasoned war General to oversee the basic training of new draftees, only a few months after being promoted to Brigadier General. However, from all accounts of every man and officer at Camp Wolters during his tenure there, Simpson was just the same man that he had been his entire life: engaged, involved, and inspiring. He continued to excel in everything he was tasked with, and as a result he was promoted to Major General in October of 1941.

Simpson LifeSimpson had been inspired at the age of ten by his grandfather Judge Hood (then a prominent judge and lawyer in Texas) to look into going to West Point, because his grandfather noticed how much he enjoyed the war games he played as a boy. So Simpson had his eye on West Point, and at the age of sixteen, he read in the paper that there was a vacant position and that they wanted to appoint someone from Parker County, Texas – which is where he was from. He and only one other boy from the area applied – and he got the appointment. After graduating from West Point in 1909, he served in the Philippines and Mexico (chasing Pancho Villa with Patton) before being promoted to Captain and joining the 33rd Division in World War I. He then got married and served in many interwar period appointments before becoming a Major General and leading the Ninth Army during WWII.

General Simpson was self-confident, tall, lean, bald, and a sharp dresser.  However, when compared to more theatrical war figures like Patton and Montgomery, he was perhaps considered a more understated, less visible leader. Regardless, Simpson’s quiet confidence and steady competence continued to make a strong impression on his commanding officers as he rose in rank.

Simpson During WWIIEisenhower himself stated that he could find no mistake in Simpson’s leadership. “He was,” Eisenhower wrote, “the type of leader American soldiers deserve.”

According to his staff that knew him well, General Simpson was a true leader, the kind of man with a real presence. He was charismatic, warm, sincere and inspiring to his officers and his men, inspiring clarity and focus even during high stress war situations. He was described as a good listener with an understanding smile, quick with praise and encouragement. His temper didn’t flare easily, but everybody knew it when he wasn’t happy, and they worked hard to correct it. Armistead D. Mead, Simpson’s wartime Brigadier General, said that he had “an iron fist in a velvet glove.”

Simpson often walked among his men casually, listening and seeking to understand when they talked about their problems. And when he said he’d look into a situation, he always did, and he always followed up.

“General Simpson’s genius lay in his charismatic manner, his command presence, his ability to listen, his unfailing use of his staff to check things out before making decisions, and his way of making all hands feel that they were important to him and to the army.” – General Armistead D. Mead

Simpson retired in 1946 and was an active member of the San Antonio community where he lived until he passed away in 1980 at age 92.

It has been truly fascinating to learn about this great man whose story is forever intertwined into the history of the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells.

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Video: Baker Preservation Society

A great video showing what the hotel looked like then and now.

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Merry Christmas, T.B. Baker

A contact recently provided me with a great old color photograph of 1920s Texas hotel magnate T.B. Baker at Christmas-time.  My best guess is that it was taken in the mid-sixties.  Here he is – around 1910 (~age 35) and around 1965 1958 (age 83).

Cheers to the hope that his Grand Old Lady will finally be restored in the new year.

T. B. Baker SCN_0003

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Who was Earl Baker?

Earl Maynard Baker, the nephew of hotel tycoon T.B. Baker, ran two of the Baker hotels for most of his adult life.  He was General Manager of the Gunter Hotel in San Antonio for over twenty years before he sold it almost at once when his uncle T.B. turned over the deed in the fifties.  Perhaps even more famously, for forty years he also managed (and later owned) the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells until his death in 1967.  During his tenure as owner, he unsuccessfully attempted to get rid of the Grand Old Lady on several occasions, and he famously followed through on his ultimatum to shut it down on his 70th birthday in 1963 if he didn’t find a buyer.  However, the hotel  did re-open again from 1965-1972, thanks to the efforts of a group of scrappy local businesspeople who wouldn’t let the landmark go – they paid Earl monthly rent to keep the doors open.

History has not been especially kind to Earl’s memory. Are some of the stories true?  Probably. But are some of them just rumors? Probably.  Based on research done so far, I’ll attempt to help separate the two:

Earl Baker & Two WomenDid Earl have a mistress named Virginia Brown who killed herself inside the Baker Hotel? It is not known whether a woman named Virginia Brown (or any mistress) existed at all, although the ghost hunter programs that routinely film inside the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells would certainly like you to think so.  According to some, the specter of Earl’s mistress Virginia still haunts her suite on the seventh floor, stopping to flirt with male visitors.  More than one person has mentioned smelling her perfume or sensing a playful spirit.  What is certain, however, is that no young woman ever killed herself inside the Baker hotel (and for the record, nobody ever jumped from the balcony to the pool, either.)  That said, what we do know is that Earl and his wife divorced at some point, and that he did not remarry.  There are enough rumors surrounding his character to make the mistress story believable, but it has not been confirmed.  And I certainly don’t have any information about who these two ladies might be with him in the picture above. Aside from the fact that there are two women sitting on his lap, that cheetah print fur is telling us quite a story of it’s own – am I right?   Edit to original post: The woman in cheetah fur has been identified as Mr. Baker’s wife, Gladys. 

Did Earl engage in court battles with his family? Yes. In the 1940s, Earl and his elderly aunt Myla (who I believe lived at the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells at the time) were engaged in a lengthy court battle in Texas over shares to the Gunter Hotel in San Antonio.   When T.B. had money to do so, he had always provided for his unmarried sister Myla, but it appears that something bitter and contentious happened between Earl and Myla later on.  The detailed court records of this case were recently discovered, in fact, and I look forward to updating you on what I find out.

Earl BakerDid Earl have a drinking problem? Sources seems to suggest – probably.  Several pictures and brochures found in his personal effects after he died suggest that he struggled with alcohol.  The picture to the left may have been taken inside an office in the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells.

Did Earl die at the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells?  Yes and no.  After Earl closed the hotel on his 70th birthday in 1963, unhappy local Mineral Wells businesspeople scraped together the funds to re-open the aging hotel, hoping to keep the tourism in town alive. Then, at some point in 1967, Earl came back to the hotel.  Some say that he had just come back for a quick visit, and others suggest that he might have begun living in the Baker Suite.   In any case, on December 3, 1967, Earl had a heart attack in the Baker Suite on the eleventh floor and subsequently died in the hospital in Mineral Wells.  Earl was 74 years old.

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New Photos of “Uncle Pete” (T.B. Baker)

I’m very excited to be able to post two recently discovered photos of T.B. Baker, the original builder and operator of The Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. A family member who knew him confirmed that this is indeed “Uncle Pete” (as he was called among family).  I’m thrilled to see that our favorite 1920s hotel tycoon is looking dapper, even well into his seventies.

The first photograph shows a relaxed family scene from what appears to be the mid-thirties,  when Baker would have been about 60.  He fell on hard times during the Depression, and his clothing seems to reflect that.

T.B. Baker "Uncle Pete"

T.B. Baker (“Uncle Pete”) c. 1935?

This second photograph was dated 1952, when T.B. Baker would have been about 76.   Love that he is wearing a double breasted suit and standing in front of a Cadillac!  The same year in 1952, T.B. Baker turned over his final ownership of all remaining hotels (including the Gunter Hotel) to his nephew Earl M. Baker.

T.B. Baker ("Uncle Pete") in ~1952 (Age 76)

T.B. Baker (“Uncle Pete”) c.1952

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Champagne Music at the Top of the Baker

Lawrence WelkYoung Lawrence Welk 1930s recalls entertaining in the Sky Room at the top of the Baker Hotel in the 1930s, back when he could barely speak English:

“I remember the Baker as one of the more lavish hotels in Texas,” he said, “A famed resort. Lots of rich ladies.”

He also often played in the dining room of the Dallas Baker Hotel for lunchtime guests.

Here is a video of a Lawrence Welk performance from 1938, which is probably an indication of what his performances at the Baker were like:

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Whatever Happened to T.B. Baker?

T.B. Baker, Baker Hotel Corporation

T.B. Baker (1929) ~50 yrs old

In October of 1929, just a month before the stock market crashed, and just a month before the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells opened, The San Antonio Newspaper ran a full page spread on T.B. Baker, the man who was “the most prominent hotel man in the South.” It’s worth noting that both Conrad Hilton and the Moody family out of Houston (with their National Hotel Company) were also competing with Baker in the race to build their own Texas hotel empires. During the roaring twenties, the oil boom was still carrying the economy forward in a flurry of activity, and men like Baker, Hilton and Moody saw their fortunes well within their reach. But when things got bad in the early thirties, they got very bad. Hilton would later write in his autobiography that he went to mass every morning to pray that he would make it through just one more day.

T.B. Baker San Antonio Express

San Antonio Express, October 29, 1929

Several articles suggest that as late as 1931, T.B. Baker was seen entertaining friends at the Savoy Hotel in London, and had taken trips to Paris. But just as quickly as his name had risen to prominence, it seemed to vanish.

T.B. Baker’s world seems to have imploded in March 1933. That month, the Baker Corporation sent a letter to all of their stockholders, telling them that the hotel business had been hard hit and that they would be unable to pay out dividends. Next, the Gunter was peeled off from other Baker Hotels and reorganized into the “Gunter Hotel Company” under different leadership and with the primary goal of paying back and satisfying the largest creditors. But minor stockholders suffered under this plan, and later that year the Baker Corporation was sued. What happened next is still somewhat unclear.

The Gunter Hotel, at least, was handed over to Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company in 1934 to manage it as trustee, until it could be placed back with the Baker Family. A similar situation happened with the Baker Hotel in Dallas after a lengthy court proceeding, in which the hotel was almost sold to the Moody family, but T.B.’s nephew Fenton J. Baker won the suit, was put in charge of the hotel and eventually regained full ownership.

T.B. Baker in 1925 (~45 years old)

T.B. Baker in 1925 (~45 yrs old)

The Baker in Mineral Wells seems to be unique in that it did remain with the Baker family during this time, but was reorganized into the “Resort Hotel Company.”

It is yet unclear about what happened to all of his other hotels and at what point the Baker Corporation may have sold them or relinquished control.

Then, in 1936, Earl M. Baker, T.B.’s other nephew, re-emerged as the buyer of the Bakers’ beloved Gunter Hotel in San Antonio, and took it back from the Life Insurance Company that had held it for the previous two years.

All the while, no mention is ever made of T.B. Baker, who did indeed still live in San Antonio. There are some who say that Earl may have found a way to take the hotels away from him. While more research is needed to find out if that statement is true, there was definitely some contention in the family. T.B.’s unmarried sister Myla (Earl’s aunt) fought a lengthy court battle against Earl from 1942 to 1948 for control of the common stock of the Gunter Hotel, which Earl eventually won.

T.B. seems to have faded into the background after 1933. He lived quietly, simply, in a small white house in South San Antonio until he died in 1972 at age 96 – nearly forty years after the turmoil of the thirties. What did he do for forty years? How does one rebuild a life of simplicity after one of such ambitious success and lavish luxury? Therein lies a story yet untold.

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Camp Wolters

Camp Wolters Infantry Replacement Training Center Mineral Wells Texas Historical PhotoOn September 16, 1940, FDR signed the “Selective Service and Training Act” which established the first peacetime draft in US history.  Then, in November of 1940, workers broke ground on Camp Wolters just outside Mineral Wells, Texas.  It would be the largest of four Infantry Replacement Training Centers in the US during WWII.

When construction  was completed in March of 1941, the camp could accommodate over 20,000 soldiers at any given time.  Many of the newly enlisted men that arrived in Mineral Wells in the spring and summer of 1941 were some of the country’s first WWII draftees.

Weatherford native General William Hood Simpson arrived in April 1941 and served as the Commanding Officer of Camp Wolters until October.  He and his wife actually lived at The Baker Hotel in downtown Mineral Wells during their seven month stay.   Later, in 1945, General Simpson would famously lead the US 9th Army across the Rhine and into Germany.

An original fact sheet about Camp Wolters from the Mineral Wells Chamber of Commerce is below:

Camp Wolters Facts Mineral Wells Texas History

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Will Rogers At The Baker

450px-Will_Rogers_-_1940s_-_colorThe Cherokee cowboy-philosopher, humorist, and actor known as Will Rogers was perhaps one of the world’s best known celebrities throughout the 20s and 30s. Known as “Oklahoma’s Favorite Son,” he penned countless stories and newspaper articles, starred in vaudeville shows and motion pictures, and perfected his own unique brand of folksy political satire and humorous social commentary that spoke to the heart of the culture of the time.

Sometime in the early 1930s before Rogers’ untimely death in 1935 (at the young age of 55) he visited the famous Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells. The photograph below shows him standing on the front steps with Mineral Wells Mayor Charlton Brown along with other unidentified local citizens. The banner behind him says: Welcome to Mineral Wells, Where America Drinks its Way to Health.

Will Rogers at Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells in Early 1930s

Will Rogers at The Baker Hotel (Early 1930s)

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